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Revealed: The best commuter villages with homes for less than £500,000

Escape to the country: The best commuter villages where workers moving out of London can snap up homes for less than £500,000 within a 45-minute journey-time

  • Villages such as Wooburn Green, Ardingly and Ryarsh feature in the new list
  • Research was carried out by estate agents Savills and printed in the Telegraph 
  • It comes as firms such as PwC have announced plans to keep flexible working
  • This means London workers can now increasingly look outside city for homes 

The best commuter villages where workers moving out of London can snap-up homes for less than £500,000 have been revealed.

With Covid having a huge and potentially lasting impact on the working habits of millions of office workers – many of whom are now working from home – properties in the capital’s commuter belt are increasingly in demand.

And that demand could grow, with some major firms already announcing plans for more flexible working arrangements.

Building society Nationwide last month announced its 13,000 office workers would be given the choice of where they work from.

And auditing giant PwC recently told employees they can spend around half their working hours at home and end shifts early on Fridays in the summer.

With other major firms also discussing a push towards flexible working, many of London’s office workers could now look outside the city for a cheaper and quieter life.

Now estate agents Savills has analysed property prices in village parishes within 10km of all stations within a 45 minute journey of London.

The analysis, first published by the Telegraph, only includes villages with top ranked primary schools in them.

Wooburn Green, Bucks

Set in the south of beautiful Buckinghamshire, Wooburn Green is a small village to the south east of High Wycombe.

The village, which has a large green in the centre, was once served by its own station, which closed in 1970.   

It is now served by nearby Bourne End station, which has indirect services to London’s Paddington station.

Set in the south of beautiful Buckinghamshire, Wooburn Green is a small village to the south east of High Wycombe

However commuters can also catch a 23 minute train link to London Marylebone via pricey Beaconsfield – a five-minute drive from the village.

It is also near to the M40, providing good road links to both London and Birmingham.   

Thornborough, Bucks

Much further to the north of Buckinghamshire is the village of Thornborough – located two miles east of the county town of Buckingham. 

The village was recorded in the Doomsday book of 1086 as Torneberge.

Much further to the north of Buckinghamshire is the village of Thornborough – located two miles east of the county town of Buckingham

It has a village church, one of very few in Britain to have steel bells, and a thatched village pub.

Thornborough has a 41-minute commute from Milton Keynes station.  

Haddenham, Bucks

Around half-way between the two villages – in the west of Buckinghamshire – is the pretty village of Haddenham.  

Home to around 5,000 people, the village is about 5 miles south-west of Aylesbury. 

Home to around 5,000 people, the village of Haddenham is about 5 miles south-west of Aylesbury

The village’s name is believed to derive from Old English and possibly the Hadding tribe – who also gave their name to Haddenham in Cambridshire.

It has a duck pond which has recently been used as a backdrop for a Halifax advert featuring the Thunderbirds.

The village has both an Anglican and catholic church, as well as baptist and Methodist chapels, and two pubs, the Rising Sun and the Kings Head.

Haddenham also has a 41-minute link from its own station – two miles outside the village. 

Manuden, Essex

Situated in the North East of Essex, Manuden is a small village around 4 miles north of Bishops Stortford.

It too is mentioned in the Doomsday book of 1086 and is now part of a conservation area – with several listed buildings.

Situated in the North East of Essex, Manuden is a small village around 4 miles north of Bishops Stortford

The village has a school – Manuden County Primary School – which once topped the league table of English schools at KS2. 

Bishops Stortford station provides commuters in Manuden with a 38-minute link to London Liverpool Street.   

Great Amwell, Herts

Situated on the outskirts of London – around 20 miles from the centre – Great Amwell is a jewel for commuters.

The village is in Hertfordshire, nearly two miles to the south east of Ware.

It has a church and a public school, Haileybury College – which was once the East India College.  

Situated on the outskirts of London – around 20 miles from the centre – Great Amwell is a jewel for commuters. It has a church and a public school, Haileybury College – which was once the East India College

In 2016 Ventura Wildlife’s Zoological Gardens – a small zoo which is home to zebras, lemurs and other animals – opened just outside the village.  

The village is served by nearby St Margarets and Rye House stations, which have 40 minutes journeys to London.

However, a quicker 32 minute train to Liverpool Street is available from Broxbourne – a 12 minute drive away. 

Ardingly, West Sussex

Ardingly is set in West Sussex’s High Weald Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty and is around 33 miles south of London.

The nearest major towns are Haywards Heath and Crawley – both of which have rail connections to London.

Ardingly is set in West Sussex’s High Weald Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty and is around 33 miles south of London

Haywards Heath station has direct trains to London Victoria, while Balcombe station has a 44 minute link to Blackfriars. 

The village, where journalist Jon Snow was born, is home to the South of England Showground – which hosts the annual South of England Agricultural Show.

Every four years holds the Scout event WS – where scouts from across the country and even other countries meet for a celebration event.

Lindfield, West Sussex

Nearby Lindfield lies a mile to the north-east of Haywards Heath. It is part of the Area of Outstanding National Beauty.

The attractive High Street has over forty medieval and post medieval timber-framed houses with a natural spring-fed pond with fish, ducks, and herons at the bottom.

Lindfield lies a mile to the north-east of Haywards Heath. It is part of the Area of Outstanding National Beauty

In the Doomsday Book it was part of the Archbishop of Canterbury’s lands.

Its parish Church, All Saints, has a history dating back to 1098. 

Nearby Haywards Heath station has direct trains to London Victoria, while Balcombe station has a 44 minute link to Blackfriars.  

Turners Hill, West Sussex

Home to around 2,000 residents, Turners Hill is located three miles south-west of East Grinstead and four miles to the south-east of Crawley.

It has a village green, as well as two pubs and a church. Jimmy Page, the former guitarist from Pink Floyd, is said to own a house in the village.

Turners Hill has a village green, as well as two pubs and a church. Jimmy Page, the former guitarist from Pink Floyd, is said to own a house in the village

The area to the north of the village has been part of a major residential development in recent years.

Residents in Turners Hill can catch a 30-minute train journey from Gatwick Airport to Victoria.  

The village is also a short drive away from the M23 motorway – which feeds into London and the M25.

Ryarsh, Kent

Ryarsh in Kent is believed to be a former Saxon Village, which is now home to around 1,000 residents. 

In the Doomsday book, the village was owned by Odo of Bayeux – the half-brother of William the Conqueror.

Ryarsh in Kent is believed to be a former Saxon Village, which is now home to around 1,000 residents

It is also home to the Ryarsh Circle – a supposedly man-made chalk circle which is shrouded in mystery.

The village has a green, a village hall and a church.

It has particularly good transport links and is close to the A20, M20 and M25.

Village can also commute into London via Snodland station’s 43-minute train link.

Cranleigh, Surrey

Claimed by some to be the largest village in England, Cranleigh in Surrey, as of the 2011 census it had a population of nearly 12,000 people.

The village is located about 8 miles southeast of Guildford – but serves as its own shopping centre for its surrounding villages.

Claimed by some to be the largest village in England, Cranleigh in Surrey, as of the 2011 census it had a population of nearly 12,000 people

Being a large village, it has three supermarkets and two national banks, as well as a number of state schools.

It did at one time have its own railway station, which was closed in the 1965 Beeching’s cuts. 

Residents now face a short drive into Guildford, where they can catch a 37 minute train to London Waterloo. 

Worplesdon, Surrey

Three miles to the north-west of Guildford lies Worplesdon in Surrey.

The village is steeped in royal history, and was once home to courtier to 17th century courtier Sir Anthony Browne.

Lord Annandale later took the lease of the manor, followed by The Harbord family and later John Payne of Hurtmore and Thomas Newton of Stoke.

The village of Worplesdon is steeped in royal history, and was once home to courtier to 17th century courtier Sir Anthony Browne.

The village has a Grade I listed church, a memorial hall and a series of sports facilities – including a cricket pitch. 

Worplesdon has its own station with a direct 33-minute line to London. 

Winkfield, Berks

Winkfield is a large village and civil parish in east Berkshire, which, as of the 2011 census had a population of 14,998. 

Winkfield is a large village and civil parish in east Berkshire, which, as of the 2011 census had a population of 14,998

It is located between Bracknell and Windsor and has its own church and pub.

There is no station, and residents of Winkfield have a 15-minute drive from Maidenhead, where they can catch a 20 minute train to London.   

Twyford, Berks

Situated in the royal county of Berkshire, the large village of Twyford is home to around 7,000 residents.

Believed to date back to the Anglo-Saxon era, the village’s name is thought to mean double ford – referencing its two fords over two branches of the River Loddon.

Situated in the royal county of Berkshire, the large village of Twyford is home to around 7,000 residents

It has a large Waitrose supermarket, as well as a Tesco Express, and other shops, cafes, restaurants and a post office.

It has good links to the M40, M4 and M3 – providing road links to large parts of the country including London.

Twyford also has its own station with a 28 minute train. 

Compton, Berks

Located in the Berkshire Downs, Compton is situated six miles south of Didcot.

The village has a 13th century Anglican church and is home to the successful secondary school Downs School.

Located in the Berkshire Downs, Compton is situated six miles south of Didcot. The village has a 13th century Anglican church and is home to the successful secondary school Downs School.

Large parts of the 1990s BBC television Trainer were filmed in and around the village.

Commuters can travel via Didcot Parkway’s 41 minute London link. 

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