World News

Meghan Markle jokes she looked like Krusty the Clown in hair disaster after trying to copy Andie MacDowell cut as a kid

MEGHAN Markle joked that she resembled Krusty the Clown as a child after attempting to copy Andie MacDowell's haircut in the iconic 90's movie Four Weddings and a Funeral.

The Duchess of Sussex, 40, poked fun at her younger self in an interview with Ellen DeGeneres on Thursday, in which she also shared a series of amusing images showcasing the disastrous cut.


The admission came as Ellen had been quizzing Meghan on a children's book she wrote as a child for a school project, which was titled "A Face Without Freckles is a Night Without Stars."

Included inside the book was a hand-drawn self-portrait, showing a 10 or 11-year-old Meghan with a cropped curly haircut.

"This is what I looked like," she said, after mocking her artistic skills. "And the reason why my hair looked like that then was because I was obsessed with Andie MacDowell in Four Weddings and a Funeral. 

“All I wanted was that perfect little curly haircut. So I asked my mom and we went to the hairdressers and got it."

'A BUMMER'

Meghan said she initially felt "amazing", believing she closely resembled MacDowell. However, she said, her elation was short-lived.

"It was as if everyone had forgotten to tell me, 'You have ethnic hair, you are not going to look like Andie MacDowell'," she said laughing, pointing at the photo.

Read our Meghan and Harry live blog for the latest updates

"And that's what it ended up evolving into," Meghan continued. "And when I got into school they told me I looked like Krusty the Clown from the Simpsons."

Meghan called her hair fail a "bummer", adding: "Yeah I had a whole vibe going on there."

During the same segment, Meghan also laughed when Ellen addressed her by her royal title.

The former actress left out a stifled giggle while discussing her children's book, 'The Bench', as Ellen poked fun at how difficult it was to say "the Duchess of Sussex."

Meghan caused a stir when she opted to use her royal title as her author name – despite wanting to cut ties with the British monarchy.

Meghan and Harry can still be known as the Duke and Duchess of Sussex after being given the titles as a wedding gift at their 2018 nuptials at Windsor Castle.

But they stepped down from royal life in a desperate bid for privacy – with Meghan revealing in her Oprah interview the damaging impact royal life had had on her mental health.

'SPARK DREAD'

Speaking to Ellen about the book, which has initially been written as a poem for Harry on Father's Day, she said: "It was about my observation of [Harry] and him being a dad, which was the most beautiful thing to watch.

"And that was really the intention of it.

"Once it was shared with a couple of friends and people that we were close with they said: 'This resonates with me too because it feels really inclusive and there's representation and it's just a sweet love story between a family.'

"And I said, well ok let's turn it into a children's book and make sure that all those pieces of it – especially the softer side of masculinity, the softer side of fatherhood – are all in there and make sure that people can see themselves in these pages.

"Because I can remember as a little girl, you didn't always see someone who looked like you.

"And I thought that was really important to have everyone's story feel like it was unfolding on those pages for them."

Prior to Meghan's surprise appearance on The Ellen Show on Thursday, a royal expert warned that the interview would "spark dread" inside the walls of Buckingham Palace, following her bombshell chat with Opera earlier this year.

Angela Levin, the author of Harry: A Biography of a Prince, told the Sun: "I think the palace dreads everything she says because she can be so rude.

"The interview with Oprah was bad timing. Prince Harry's grandfather was ill. It is all about what is good to her. She's ruthless and she thinks of herself first."

In the Oprah chat, the Sussexes alleged there were conversations with Harry and a "family" member about their unborn son Archie and what color his skin would be – and "what that would mean or look like".



We pay for your stories!

Do you have a story for The US Sun team?

Email us at [email protected] or call 212 416 4552.

Like us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/TheSunUS and follow us from our main Twitter account at @TheSunUS

    Source: Read Full Article