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Katie Price pays tribute to 'beautiful' mum Amy who 'doesn't have long to live' and loves her 'to the moon and back'

KATIE Price paid tribute to her "beautiful" mum Amy after revealing she hasn't got long left.

The 42-year-old shared a glamorous close-up portrait of her mum taken three years ago on Instagram.

She wrote: "Mummy you look beautiful in this picture three years ago ❤️❤️ I love you to the moon and back as we say ❤️❤️."

Amy has a life-limiting lung condition called idopathic pulmonary fibrosis and would be at high risk of serious illness if she was to contract coronavirus.

Katie's fans noted the similarities between the two and showered Amy with compliments.

One wrote: "Beautiful ❤️ you are your mums double."

Another posted: "Princess looks like your mum so much! 😍."

A third said: "You got your looks from her!"

Back in February Katie revealed Amy only had 32 per cent lung capacity and doesn't have long left to live.

The businesswoman appeared on Northen Ireland's Nolan Live and revealed her mum's condition had deteriorated.

Amy, 64, is holding out hope for a lung transplant to prolong her life.

Katie said: "Now she's on oxygen, it's hit home again. She's only got like 32 per cent left of her lung capacity. So if you imagine now being that out of breath, it must be awful, and it's an awful way to go.

"It's horrible to see my mum go through it because she's so active, it's cruel."

The mum-of-five said Amy turned to the British Lung Foundation for support and advice and was told to make the most of the time she has left.

Katie continued: "Just build memories, take lots of pictures, that's all you can do really. You know it's coming and have to learn to deal with it."

Amy also opened up about the grim reality of her health condition as she was unable to see her family due to Covid.

She appeared on Good Morning Britain via Zoom alongside Katie from their respective homes, telling hosts Piers Morgan and Susanna Reid that she has "no hope" of surviving if she catches Covid or even a cold.

"I'm very up and down really, to be honest with you," said Amy. "Obviously it's terminal and I should imagine I'm in the last couple of years now.

"What with Covid and everything, if I catch a cold or Covid there's just no hope, so that would be the end of it for me.

"But positively, I'm hoping, I'm pushing to see if I can get on the transplant list.


"Because there is no cure there's nothing else they can do for me really, it's just palliative care, they're just trying to keep me comfortable."

Amy then admitted that even if she did get a transplant there was not much chance of it being successful because of her age.

"My age is against me and the results are not that good as you get older and you could die in the operating theatre, you could reject (the donated organ)… and if you can get through all of that, you would have a better quality of life and maybe live another two or three years," she explained.

The grandmother also revealed "it was somewhat of a relief" that she has not seen Katie or much of her family in real life for months.

"I haven't seen Kate since October, since my birthday, but we're a lot more closer because we make an effort to keep in contact with Zoom," Amy said.

What is Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF)?

Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a condition in which the lungs become scarred and breathing becomes increasingly difficult.

It's not clear what causes it, but it usually affects people who are around 70 to 75 years old, and is rare in people under 50.

Several treatments can help reduce the rate at which IPF gets worse, but there's currently no treatment that can stop or reverse the scarring of the lungs.

The symptoms of IPF tend to develop gradually and get slowly worse over time.

Symptoms include shortness of breath, a persistent dry cough, tiredness, loss of appetite and weight loss, rounded and swollen fingertips.

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