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Kanye West on Race, Mental Health & More: 8 Highlights From Part 2 of Nick Cannon's Podcast

Kanye West has more to say.

The Yeezy designer opened up about everything from his relationship with God to the Taylor Swift-VMAs controversy on last week's episode of Nick Cannon's podcast—which the actor and musician dubbed "part 1" of "one of the most open interviews" Cannon's Class has ever seen—and now, part 2 is here.

In an equally lengthy episode released on Tuesday, Kanye went into detail about his presidential aspirations, as well as his 2020 opponents, what he's learned about himself throughout the campaign and whether or not he'll run again in the future.

The rapper also revealed what went down during his meeting with Jared Kushner, though he made it clear that he doesn't owe anyone any explanations.

"I don't care if we got ice cream, I can meet with whoever I want," Kanye told Nick. "You know why? Because I'm free. And so many Black people—so many people—are just not free. I have the freedom to vote for who I want. I have the freedom to meet with whoever I want."

Keep reading to see what else Kanye discussed, including fatherhood, his mental health and teaching his wife Kim Kardashian about "the white voice."

On the state of his 2020 bid for the White House:

Nick asked Kanye a multitude of questions about his current presidential campaign, including whether or not him winning is "realistic right now." 

"Well God has made unreal things happen," Kanye responded. "Is it realistic for me to be here?"

The rapper later explained that even if it doesn't happen this year, "I shall be president at some point in our lifetime."

He added, "The reason why I know that I will eventually—eventually could be three months, eventually could be three and a half years—the reason why I eventually will make a great president is because I'm sensitive. I'm here. I'm here to serve."

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On being grateful for the past couple of months:

"If I hadn't of run for president, I wouldn't have been in South Carolina," Kanye said, referring to his first-ever presidential rally, where he detailed a significant moment in his life when he and Kim learned they were expecting their first child together, North West, and they both initially contemplated abortion before deciding against it in the end. "God wouldn't of broke me down and had the media ridicule me in this way."

He continued, "To be ridiculed for crying for your daughter…the world needed to see me. The world needed to see themselves; the fact that they would do that. But also I needed to see myself."

"I've had to be so strong that I didn't even know that I could break down," Kanye later added. "I've been through so much, I didn't know that I could break down."

On public speculation about his mental health:

"The funny thing is, people call me crazy and they discriminate against people with mental illness, or mental abilities," Kanye explained. "Mental abilities—because it's actually an ability. It's a superpower. I'm not even gonna let y'all tell me it's an illness because I'm seeing the truth inside of a phony world."

On having an important conversation about race with Kim:

"What is beautiful about the Black existence in America, it sharpens you just to be a Black person in America," Kanye told Nick before recalling a conversation he had with Kim.

"I remember spending three hours explaining what the white voice was to my wife. Because for her, it's just her voice. Just the voice," he began. "I had to explain that in order to get a job—if you want a job downtown—you have to act white. And you could lose your job if you acted Black."

He continued, "But the thing is, you not acting if you 'act Black.' You're actually being yourself. So your existence, just to be able to pay for your wellbeing, you literally have to act like a white person."

On fatherhood:

"With my children, I have to be in front. I have to be there," Kanye told Nick. "I have to be present—not just the dad that comes with the cool presents, I have to be present…and I have to speak up…I've had to raise my voice certain times on things that I stood for morally."

On his meeting with Jared Kushner:

Nick broached the topic, pointing out that some described Kanye's August meeting with Donald Trump's senior advisor as "secret" and that Kushner was using Kanye "as a puppet."

"It ain't no secret meeting," Kanye began. "So the thing is, I'm not one of these 'I'm Black, so I'm Democrat.'"

He continued, "I wanted to meet with Bernie Sanders before; he wouldn't meet with me. Now, I'm fine to meet with Biden. I would meet with anybody. I love everybody. Jesus loves everybody."

At the meeting, Kanye recalled Kushner bringing a copy of Dr. Claud Anderson's book PowerNomics, which he described as having Kushner's own notes, annotations and underlined sections.

"Claud Anderson has a four-year plan for rebuilding the Black community. That is what we talked about," Kanye told Nick. "But I don't care if we talked about ice cream. I could get ice cream. That's what I'm saying. I don't have to justify none of my actions. Period."

He went on to describe Jared as a "friend," noting that they knew each other prior to the Trump administration. 

"Trump used to go to awards shows with Puff Daddy!" he added.

On speculation that he's secretly working with the Republican party:

Kanye brought up that people have theorized he's "in cahoots" with Republicans. As Nick put it, "They saying that they paying you to do what you're doing to be a distraction."

"Bro, can't nobody pay me," Kanye said. "I got more money than Trump."

On his current ventures:

According to Kanye, he's building "Plan A," which involves "giving stipends" and "creating an orphanage."

"Right now I'm donating my land to build an orphanage," he explained, also discussing his vision for the Cody, Wyoming-based manufacturing hub for his collaboration with Gap, which will bring jobs to the local economy.

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