Fashion

I used a face tanning machine for 18 minutes & it utterly ruined my looks and changed my life | The Sun

A WOMAN has gone viral after showing what her face looked like after using a tanning machine for 18 minutes.

Looking to bronze up her face, one fair-skinned beauty decided to use a tanning machine for close to 20 minutes straight – but instead of a tan, she was left with scars and severe burns.


The avid fitness fanatic, Emma Hoffstrom, from Sweden, took it to TikTok to share her mortifying story in a video that's been viewed more than 4.6 million times.

Urging fellow beauty lovers to learn from her experience, Emma said: ''Please be careful with your skin.''

At the start of the viral clip, the young woman had inserted a snap of herself smiling by the face tanning machine – however, things took a very sharp turn and the smile had vanished in the following images.

With a bright red face, Emma ended up in a hospital where she was then covered in white bandage tape.

read more beauty stories

Tanning addict raves about Lidl’s £2.99 fake tan as she shows her whopping stash

Lash tech proudly shows off her £250 lashes but trolls say they look like brooms

The blonde was in tears when she revealed just how ruined her skin had become – the face was puffy and full of what appeared to be painful blisters.

After going viral, Emma uploaded a follow-up video where she explained what had happened and why she had been tanning for such a long period.

''The tanning bed was actually broken.

''It's supposed to have a limit of how much UV light you get – and on this one, it had no limit.

Most read in Fabulous

LIP SERVICE

Men say they hate my lip fillers, but they don't know what I looked like before

WATER GOOD IDEA

Dad shares genius hack to fill up giant paddling pool without a hose

BREAST LIFE

How Katie Price has gone from natural 32B boobs to ‘biggest ever’ bust

BIG CHANGE

I was trolled for being ‘too fat’ to date – now lads are queuing up in my DMs

''So I got too much of the UV light, which made the burn damage in my face.

''I mean, it was hot, like you were in the sun. But I didn't feel that anything bad would happen.''

FABULOUS BINGO: Get a £20 bonus & 30 free spins when you spend £10 today

Despite having suffered, Emma revealed she had made the decision to not sue the salon where she had used the tanning device.

''It was too much of a stress already with the pain and trying to recover.''

The Swedish woman relied heavily on painkillers, antibiotics and different creams prescribed by doctors.

Although she hoped that she would never get diagnosed with skin cancer, Emma was aware of the dangers and has since recovered from the severe burns and extreme puffiness.

Sunbeds have long been linked to skin cancer and have even been banned in countries like Brazil and Australia.

According to the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), there is significant evidence to show that using tanning beds causes melanoma.

They report that sunbeds increase the risk of skin cancer by up to 20 per cent, and also state that they have no positive benefits to our health.

Sharing her expertise, Carol Cooper, Sun Doctor, said: '' Let’s be clear about sunbeds. It’s not just ‘some’ experts that say they’re bad for your skin. It’s almost all of them.

''All three common skin cancers are linked with excess UV rays.

''And there’s overwhelming evidence that, compared with natural sunlight, sunbeds are far more likely to cause skin cancer.

Read More on The Sun

We were fed up of the housing market so bought a shabby mobile home for £750

I’m in between sizes – here’s how I make too-big pants fit perfectly

''Actually, anyone who’s ever used a sunbed is at least 20% more likely to develop malignant melanoma, the deadliest skin cancer.

''UV rays damage the DNA in skin cells, so they’re more likely to mutate into cancer. You don’t even have to burn for it to happen.''




SHOULD YOU USE SUNBEDS?

The NHS warns against using sunbeds due to them emitting ultraviolet (UV) rays that increase your risk of developing skin cancer.

The website states: "Many sunbeds give out greater doses of UV rays than the midday tropical sun.

"People who are frequently exposed to UV rays before the age of 25 are at greater risk of developing skin cancer later in life.

"Sunbeds, sunlamps and tanning booths give out the same type of harmful radiation as sunlight."

    Source: Read Full Article