Celebrities

The Umbrella Academy's Tom Hopper and wife Laura open up on raising autistic son

Tom Hopper and his wife Laura have opened up on raising his five-year-old son Freddie, who is autistic.

The couple have been vocal in raising awareness of their son’s condition, sharing posts to their social media accounts detailing their experience, as they hope to help other parents in similar situations.

Speaking to People about the help they are offering, Tom explained: ‘You have to trust each other and the journey. The right things will happen eventually, but it doesn’t happen overnight.

‘My son has autism, and he amazes me every day. His brain just works in a different way.’

Tom, 35, and Laura, 32, first noticed something different about Freddie when he was around 18 months old, and they received his autism diagnosis just before his birthday in March.

‘The first thing we noticed was Freddie wouldn’t turn around for his name,’ Laura said. ‘From there, the older he got, the more of a gap there was between him and other children his age, in terms of his progress.’

Laura added that it was important she and her husband were able to ‘recognise the regression’, as they then turned to researching autism, before later realising that not all children who have it are alike.

Tom continued: ‘The biggest thing for us was learning Freddie. We’ve had to figure out what works for him and what doesn’t.’

The Umbrella Academy star added that he and Laura later decided to eliminate processed sugars from Freddie’s diet, which they believe has helped to control his behaviour, calling the difference ‘massive’.

He also revealed that his son continues to enjoy activities most other children would do, such as ‘laughing, running and playing in the garden’.

Tom and Laura had confirmed their son’s diagnosis in a video shared to Instagram earlier this year, with Laura saying: ‘We’ve known that Freddie is different for quite a while, some people would say superhuman, and others would say autistic.

‘Basically we want to raise awareness for people like Freddie, or parents.’

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