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Katherine Jenkins recalls a 'disastrous' intimate lunch with the Queen

Katherine Jenkins recalls a ‘disastrous’ intimate lunch with the Queen as she details her numerous meetings with the ‘maternal’ monarch

Katherine Jenkins has recalled attending a ‘disastrous’ intimate lunch with the late Queen Elizabeth II.

The Welsh mezzo-soprano, 42, told how she was faced with an elaborate course she ‘didn’t really understand’ while dining with the monarch at a ‘small’ luncheon at Buckingham Palace when she was in her mid-20s, leaving her red-faced.

The opera singer explained the Queen was a ‘maternal’ figure and helped her understand how to proceed with the complicated culinary concoction by following her lead.

Memories: Katherine Jenkins, 42, has recalled attending a ‘disastrous’ intimate lunch with the late Queen Elizabeth II

Appearing on This Morning on Thursday, Katherine said: ‘When I was in my mid-20s I got invited to a small lunch at Buckingham Palace.

‘They brought round a course that I didn’t really understand, with a water bowl and a piece of fruit and I was thinking, “Oh no this is a disaster!”

‘I took a piece of fruit and held it in my hand. Her Majesty sensed that and in a maternal way, she was sort of like, “Follow me.” You had to take the fruit and wash it in the water bowl and dry it with the gauze.’

Meeting: The Welsh mezzo-soprano told how she was faced with an elaborate course she ‘didn’t really understand’ while dining with the monarch at a ‘small’ luncheon at Buckingham Palace (pictured with the Queen in 2012)

Adding of her fondness of the Queen, Katherine said: ‘I’m a big fan of hers and have great memories from singing God Save The Queen to her.’

The words of the British national anthem have changed from ‘Queen’ to ‘King’ in the wake of Queen Elizabeth II’s death on Thursday as her son King Charles III now assumes the throne. 

She was in a small church in a remote area of Sussex recording when she received the call from the BBC saying that they would like her to record God Save The King.  

Appearing on This Morning, Katherine said: ‘They brought round a course that I didn’t really understand, with a water bowl and a piece of fruit and I was thinking, “Oh no this is a disaster!”

Sweet: She continued: ‘I took a piece of fruit and held it in my hand. Her Majesty sensed that and in a maternal way, she was sort of like, “Follow me”

Katherine began: ‘I got a call from the BBC and they said we’d like to play the first version of God Save The King.

‘There were a few of us we took a few minutes silence and reflection and said a little prayer for The Queen before we recorded it.’

‘It was emotional. But we have to think of the future.’

The singer, who took to the stage at the Queen’s Platinum Jubilee, earlier this year, said she got more nervous every time she met Her Majesty.  

Remembrance: Adding of her fondness of the Queen, Katherine said: ‘I’m a big fan of hers and have great memories from singing God Save The Queen to her’

Speaking about the event, she added: ‘I curtseyed for her as she went past and she said, “Oh Catherine!” out of the window of her car.’

‘Over the years as I’ve learnt things from meeting her I’ve admired her more and more, her as a mother and as a role model, I got more nervous every time I saw her.’

‘The most nerve-racking it was a private dinner and I preformed to her there, just me and a piano.’

The singer continued: ‘Over the years as I’ve learnt things from meeting her I’ve admired her more and more, her as a mother and as a role model, I got more nervous every time I saw her’ (On stage at Platinum Jubilee of Elizabeth II in June 2022)

Adding of her many performances, she recalled: ‘The most nerve-racking it was a private dinner and I preformed to her there, just me and a piano’ (Pictured together in 2017) 

The Queen’s death will see Britain and her Commonwealth realms enter into a ten-day period of mourning as millions of her subjects in the UK and abroad come to terms with her passing.

As her son accedes to the throne, there will also be a celebration of her historic 70-year reign that saw her reach her Platinum Jubilee this year – a landmark unlikely to be reached again by a British monarch.

Charles, the King, said: ‘The death of my beloved mother, Her Majesty The Queen, is a moment of the greatest sadness for me and all members of my family.

‘We mourn profoundly the passing of a cherished sovereign and a much-loved mother. I know her loss will be deeply felt throughout the country, the Realms and the Commonwealth, and by countless people around the world.

‘During this period of mourning and change, my family and I will be comforted and sustained by our knowledge of the respect and deep affection in which the Queen was so widely held.’

Mourning: The Queen’s death will see Britain and her Commonwealth realms enter into a ten-day period of mourning as millions come to terms with her passing

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